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Persuasive Essay Writing Webquest



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Persuasive Essay Notes


 


DIRECTIONS: Use the words listed below to fill in the blanks.
ad hominem
author's purpose
analogy
appeal to authority (association)
bandwagon
broad generalization
cause and effect
circular thinking
closing paragraph
common sense
direct order
emotional appeal
euphoria
fact
famous people testimonial
flag-waving
free or bargain
glittering generalities
hook
hyperbole
irony
loaded words
main argument
main idea
opinion
parallelism
plain folks appeal
proof
propaganda technique
reasoning
repetition
rhetorical question
scientific terms
slogans
snob appeal
stacking the deck
statement from a professional
subject
supporting arguments
supporting details
transfer

  • 1) An interesting quote, question, fact, anecdote, sentence or
    paragraph that helps to grab the reader's attention.

    Answer:
  • 2) Identify the reason the author wrote the piece.
    Answer:
  • 3) One or two words that tells what the piece is about.
    Answer:
  • 4) What the author is trying to say about the subject.
    Answer:
  • 5) When the author chooses a side related to a particular subject
    (Ex: Capital punishment should be stopped.)

    Answer:
  • 6) The facts or ideas that are used to make or prove a point or
    explain or describe a topic.

    Answer:
  • 7) Information that helps to prove your supporting arguments (reasons)
    to be true.

    Answer:
  • 8) A detail about something that exists or something that really
    happened that can be proven to be true.

    Answer:
  • 9) Methods, not based on fact, that are used to make arguments more
    persuasive.

    Answer:
  • 10) Someone who is an expert, like a doctor, lawyer, teacher, coach,
    etc. in a particular area, that gives a statement that supports
    your point.

    Answer:
  • 11) Writers often explain why things happen. The events or situations
    that happen first are the "causes." the event or event that
    happens as a result are the "effects." (ex: If you stand out in
    the rain, you will catch a cold.)

    Answer:
  • 12) Using emotional charged words that will produce strong positive or
    negative feelings (Ex: Many radicals support that bill, which will
    hurt the hardworking moms and dads who make America strong.)

    Answer:
  • 13) Only the good side is mentioned. Unfavorable facts are withheld.
    Answer:
  • 14) Common, everyday people support it. You are to believe that
    because these people are like you, they can be trusted. (Ex: As a
    construction worker, I often get headaches on the job. That's why
    I use PainAway aspirin.)

    Answer:
  • 15) Broad statements that have little substance are made.
    Answer:
  • 16) The "best" people support it. This technique suggests that you can
    be like the expensively dressed, perfectly shaped people who
    support whatever the issue is. (Ex: I accept only the best, and
    that's why I buy Aloft perfume.)

    Answer:
  • 17) The conlclusion just restates the beginning.
    Answer:
  • 18) You are urged to do or believe something because everyone else
    does. (Ex: Be where the action is. Shop at Hang-out Mall.

    Answer:
  • 19) Words or images that appeal to the audience's emotions are used.
    The appeal may be to positive emotions, such as desire for success,
    or to negative ones, such as fear. (Ex: What would you do if all
    your possessions were lost in a fire? Get the Save-All fireproof
    safe and protect your valuables.)

    Answer:
  • 20) Sometimes a writer will ask a questin to which no answer is
    required. The writer implies that the answer is obvious; the
    reader has no choice to agree with the writer's point.

    Answer:
  • 21) Overly repetitive writing can become tiresome. However, when used
    sparingly for effect, it can reinforce the writer's message and/or
    entertain the reader. Writers may repeat a word, a phrase or an
    entire sentence for emphasis.

    Answer:
  • 22) When an author creates a "balanced" sentence by re-using the same
    word structure, this called parallelism. Always strive for
    parallelism when using compound or complex sentences.

    Answer:
  • 23) This tool is not limited to poets. Essay writers often use figures
    of speech or comparisons (simile, metaphor, personification) for
    desired emphasis.

    Answer:
  • 24) A writer may mention an important event or person in an essay to
    lend importance or credibility to his/her argument.

    Answer:
  • 25) This is one of the more enjoyable persuasive techniques. It
    involves completely overstating and exaggerating your point for
    effect. (Ex: Like when your mom says, 'I must have asked you a
    million times to clean your room!' Get it?)

    Answer:
  • 26) Irony is present if the writer's words contain more than one
    meaning. This may be in the form of sarcasm, gentle irony, or a
    pun (play on words). It can be used to add humour or to emphasize
    an implied meaning under the surface. The writer's "voice" becomes
    important here.

    Answer:
  • 27) Using names or pictures of famous people but not direct quotes.
    Answer:
  • 28) A speaker suggests that the public can get something for nothing or
    almost nothing.

    Answer:
  • 29) In glowing terms and offering no evidence the speaker or advertiser
    supports a candidate or a solution to social problems.

    Answer:
  • 30) Trying to persuade using everyday sense of good or bad/right or
    wrong.

    Answer:
  • 31) Restates the main idea (main rgument) and supporting arguments.
    Answer:
  • 32) A feeling or belief about something.
    Answer:
  • 33) These are the reasons why the author feels we should believe their
    main argument.

    Answer:
  • 34) Famous people endorse a product or idea. (Ex: I'm professional
    football player Marcus Browning, and I use Wash Out window cleaner.)

    Answer:
  • 35) Luring the reader by listening or explaining reasons or an idea.
    Answer:
  • 36) A brief, striking phrase that may include labeling and
    stereotyping. May be enlisted to support reasoned ideas, in
    practice they tend to act only as emotional appeals. (Ex:
    Opponents of the US's invasion and occupation of Iraq use the
    slogan "blood for oil" to suggest that the invasion and its human
    losses was done to access Iraq's oil riches.)

    Answer:
  • 37) A Latin phrase which has come to mean attacking your opponent, as
    opposed to attacking their arguments.

    Answer:
  • 38) This technique hopes to simplify the decision making process by
    using images and words to tell the audience exactly what actions to
    take, eliminating any other possible choices. Authority figures
    can be used to give the order, overlapping it with the appeal to
    authority technique, but not necessarily. (Ex: The Uncle Sam "I
    want you" image is an example of this technique.)

    Answer:
  • 39) The use of an event that generates euphoria or happiness, or using
    an appealing event to boost morale. Can be created by declaring a
    holiday, making luxury items available, or mounting a military
    parade with marching bands and patriotic messages.

    Answer:
  • 40) An attempt to justify an action on the grounds that doing so will
    make one more patriotic, or in some way benefit a group, country,
    or idea. The feeling of patriotism which this technique attempts
    to inspire may not necessarily diminish or entirely omit one's
    capability for rational examination of the matter in question.

    Answer:

   


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